Limb Isolation Trick

Quite often, I’ll achieve a great throwline throw over the perfect limb, only to lose it when trying to isolate it because the throwbag snags on the far side and jumps clear of the limb I want. This alternative approach occurred to me this morning:

This might be old news to seasoned climbers, but it only occurred to me today…

Nice Slender Pine

Climbed this in the sun this afternoon…

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On setting up I learned two things: 1) My big shot will just shoot a 14oz bag to the highest point my throwline will go over and still reach the ground. 2) My throwline is exactly the same length as my rope. Thus, my rig looked like this as I clipped in…..

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After that, though it was just a lovely ascent through the void… well, through the holly bush and creepers mucking up the bottom of the tree, and the many pine cones wanting to get into my t-shirt.

Emma Thompson Still Wonderful

From the LA TImes:

“When Skydance Media Chief Executive David Ellison announced this year that he was hiring John Lasseter to head Skydance Animation, many in and outside the company were shocked and deeply unhappy. Only months earlier, Lasseter had ended his relationship with Pixar — where he had worked since the early ’80s — and parent company Disney after multiple allegations of inappropriate behavior and the creation of a frat house-like work environment. Lasseter had admitted to inappropriate hugging and “other missteps.”

After announcing the hire, Ellison sent a long email to staff, noting that Lasseter was contractually obligated to behave professionally, and convened a series of town halls in which Lasseter apologized for past behavior and asked to be given the chance to prove himself to his new staff. Meanwhile, Mireille Soria, president of Paramount Animation, with which Skydance has a distribution deal, took the highly unusual step of meeting with female employees to tell them that they could decline to work with Lasseter.”

Emma walks.

>35m Sprydon Sequoia

This is properly tricky as the first fifteen metres comprise only downward-sloping limbs… You can see Jos in the first picture having slid his anchor down the limb to the first fork during his ascent. The heavy rain in the morning and moss on the limbs made it ridiculously slippery. This needed some quite tricky re-jigging and it did feel a teeny bit precarious during that corrective operation.

Once that was done, though, the view - and the wind - was absolutely tremendous!

I climbed down to what I estimated was half-way and set a doubled-rope anchor with my 45m rope, which at the ground left me six inches spare….. I give it a conservative estimate of at least 35m high.